ADIRONDACK FOOD SYSTEM NETWORK

AHI Announces Launch of Adirondack Food System Network

Adirondack Health Institute is pleased to announce the launch of the Adirondack Food System Network, a collaboration of multiple organizations working together as equal partners to better understand system-wide issues, identify gaps and develop realistic solutions to help strengthen and promote a more resilient food system.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, market supply chain and trade disruptions have limited food accessibility, especially for vulnerable residents lacking access to transportation and the means to purchase fresh food. At the same time, farmers have been faced with significant disruptions in market access, especially due to the closure of restaurants, retail, and other food establishments, and the threat of the loss of market access for area farmers.

A group of Adirondack food system stakeholders across the region have come together to start the Adirondack Food System Network with seed funding from Adirondack Foundation. The Network aims to help food systems stakeholders mount a coordinated effort to build back better food systems as the region recovers from the pandemic, centered on the values of collaboration, equity, environment, and lasting success.

“AHI is pleased to be serving as the backbone organization, the coordinating body that will provide support, facilitation, and guidance, for this much-needed collective impact initiative,” stated Nancy Gildersleeve, an Executive Director at Adirondack Health Institute.

“This past year, food assistance has been a big part of our COVID response grantmaking. By connecting emergency food systems with the local food system, this cross-sector network has great potential to broaden access to healthy, fresh food for residents of all ages and strengthen ties with local producers. It's a win-win,” said Connie Prickett, Adirondack Foundation Vice President of Communications and Strategic Initiatives.

“We now have a community platform for collective action focused on food and equity. We have the opportunity to address low farmer incomes and rising food insecurity in our region simultaneously,” explained Brittany Christenson, the Executive Director of ADK Action, and Co-Chair of the program’s Steering Committee. “With this network, we can connect the dots between problems and solutions across sectors and build our food system back better.”

The vision of the Network is an Adirondack regional food system that is resilient, just, environmentally responsible and supports improved human health. The mission is to advance innovative solutions through lasting collaboration that strengthen and improve our regional food system for individuals, the environment, and the economy. Collaboration will initially focus on connecting efforts in five areas: production, consumption, distribution, processing, and food waste management. The Network covers nine New York counties: Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, St. Lawrence, Saratoga, Warren, and Washington.

ADK Food System Network

Purpose

Increase communication, coordination, and collaboration among food system related organizations, agencies, and institutions.

Gain a mutual understanding of the barriers and gaps in the Adirondack Food System region and develop common goals for addressing them.

Work in alignment on broadly shared goals and measurable priorities.

Build community capacity through collaboration, education, and leveraging unique resources.

Vision

To ensure our regional food system is resilient, just, environmentally responsible, and supports improved human health.

Mission Statement

To advance innovative solutions through lasting collaborations that strengthen and improve our regional food system for individuals, the environment and the economy.

Current Trends in Adirondack Agriculture – 2017 Census of Agriculture

In April of this year, the National Agricultural Statistics Service released the 2017 census of agriculture, which includes data specific to New York State. This report, released every five years, shows emerging trends in agricultural practices across the country. Based on the most recent census, the Park region accounted for about 11 percent of the market value of all agricultural products in New York state. There are also about 5 percent fewer farms in the Adirondack Park in 2017 than in 2012 although total cropland has increased by about 2 percent. In both 2012 and 2017, about 50 percent of farms in the Adirondack Park have experienced net losses. Below is an in-depth look at current trends in Adirondack agriculture.

Agriculture Districts are a planning tool that define areas within a local jurisdiction where farming is the preferred economic activity. Districts may be voluntarily created by landowners or they may be designated in a local land-use plan. The map below is a proxy tool to show what land in the Adirondack Park is currently available and suitable for farming. This proxy represents a minimum, not a maximum

Source: Adirondack Council

Food Network Resources

The map on the right shows locations for food pantries, backpack programs, etc. and farming and food related organizations that support and promote the food network system.

 

Population Density

  • This map also contains shading to show population density.
  • The darker the shading, the higher the number of households in that zip code.
  • Please refer to the legend on the map for estimates of the number of households for each shaded color.

SNAP/WIC Vendors

All vendors in the nine-county region who accept the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and/or Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) are designated by a dot on the map.

The dots are color coded based on produce availability:

Green - High
These vendors have a full selection of fruits and vegetables for sale.

Yellow - Intermediate
These vendors have a small limited selection of fruits and vegetables for sale.

Red - None
These vendors offer almost no fruits and vegetables for sale.

Population Density

This map also contains shading to show population density. The darker the shading, the higher the number of households in that zip code. Please refer to the legend on the map for estimates of the number of households for each shaded color.

Source:

https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/retailer-locator
https://health.data.ny.gov/Health/Women-Infants-Children-WIC-Vendor-Information/4az8-5hx6

Food Insecurity

One in four food-insecure children lives in a home that is likely ineligible for Federal Nutrition programs, underscoring the critical role of both the public and private sector in addressing child food insecurity.

Projected Food Insecurity Rate (Overall)*
Food insecurity refers to USDA’s measure of lack of access, at times, to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members and limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate foods.

Annual Food Budget Shortfall*
The total calculated amount of money per year that would be required to meet all the food needs of food-insecure people in the county.

Average Meal Cost*
The national average dollar amount food-secure people report spending per week on food per feedingamerica.com.

Food Insecure Children
Number of children that are food insecure (Calculated from the child insecurity rate* x population of children**)

Food Insecurity Rate (Children)*
The percentage of children living in household in the U.S. that experience food insecurity at some point during the year. The child food-insecurity estimates in this study are derived from the same questions used by the USDA to identify food insecurity in households with children at the national level.

Food Insecurity Rate (Adults)*
The percentage of adults living in household in the U.S. that experience food insecurity at some point during the year. The adult food-insecurity estimates in this study are derived from the same questions used by the USDA to identify food insecurity in households at the national level.

Income Eligible for Nutrition Programs*
Percentage of the food insecure population that is likely eligible for federal nutrition assistance

Likely Ineligible for Nutrition Programs*
Percentage of the food insecure population that is likely ineligible for federal nutrition assistance

Population of Children**
Total number of children in the county

Sources:

* https://map.feedingamerica.org/
** https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs

Free Lunch Eligible Children

% of Children Eligible for School Lunch
(Number of children) Free Lunch Eligible (Public School) *

Total Population of Children (6 to 18 years)**

 Source:
*National Center for Education Statistics   http://nces.ed.gov/ccd/elsi/
**Source: https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs

Food Environment Atlas

Food environment factors—such as store/restaurant proximity, food prices, food and nutrition assistance programs, and community characteristics—interact to influence food choices and diet quality. These interactions are complex and more research is needed to identify causal relationships and effective policy interventions.

The objectives of the Atlas are:

  • to assemble statistics on food environment indicators to stimulate research on the determinants of food choices and diet quality, and
  • to provide a spatial overview of a community's ability to access healthy food and its success in doing so.

Expenditures per Capita, Fast Food 2007*
Expenditures per Capita, Fast Food 2012*
Expenditures per Capita, Restaurants 2007*
Expenditures per Capita, Restaurants 2012*
Fast Food Restaurants (% Change), 2011-16*
Fast-Food Restaurants, 2011*
Fast-Food Restaurants, 2016*
Full-Service Restaurants (% change), 2011-16*
Full-Service Restaurants, 2011*
Full-Service Restaurants, 2016*

*Source: https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-environment-atlas/

SNAP Household Characteristics

Given the variation in food insecurity and income and asset limits for certain programs, our census data indicates that the share of food-insecure individuals not eligible for public food assistance is very high. Over 47% of households below the poverty level are not receiving federal food assistance in the North Country.

This map has two sets of radio buttons. You can only select one button from the top list and one button from the bottom list at the same time.

Households) At or above the poverty level
(Households) Below the poverty level
Household Median Income (dollars)
Total No. of Households
(Households) With no persons with a disability
(Households) With one or more people with a disability

Households) Not receiving food stamps/SNAP
(Households) Receiving food stamps/SNAP
Total (number of households)

For example, if you select “Below the poverty level” from the top list and “Not receiving food stamps/SNAP” from the bottom list, you can see that Clinton County has 1,730 households that are below the poverty level and not receiving food stamps.

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